Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson (January 31, 1919 â€“ October 24, 1972) was an American baseball player who became the first African American to...

In addition to his cultural impact, Robinson had an exceptional baseball career. Over 10 seasons, Robinson played in six...

Robinson was also known for his pursuits outside the baseball diamond. He was the first black television analyst in MLB, and the first black vice...

Robinson was born on January 31, 1919, into a family of sharecroppers in Cairo, Georgia. He was the youngest of five children born to Jerry and Mallie Robinson, after siblings Edgar,...

The extended Robinson family established itself on a residential plot containing two small houses at 121 Pepper Street in Pasadena. Robinson's mother...

In 1935, Robinson graduated from Washington Junior High School and enrolled at John Muir High School...

At Muir Tech, Robinson played several sports at the varsity level and lettered in four of them: football, basketball,...

In 1936, Robinson won the junior boys singles championship in the annual Pacific Coast Negro Tennis Tournament and earned a place on the Pomona annual baseball tournament all-star team, which included future Hall of Famers...

After Muir, Robinson attended Pasadena Junior College (PJC), where he continued his athletic career by participating in basketball, football, baseball, and track. On the football team, he played quarterback and...

That year, Robinson was one of 10 students named to the school's Order of the Mast and Dagger (Omicron Mu Delta), awarded to students performing "outstanding service to the school and whose scholastic and citizenship record is worthy of...

An incident at PJC illustrated Robinson's impatience with authority figures he perceived as racist—a character trait that would resurface repeatedly in his life. On January 25,...

After graduating from PJC in spring 1939, Robinson transferred to UCLA, where he became the school's first...

He was one of four black players on the 1939 UCLA Bruins football team; the others were Woody Strode, Kenny Washington, and Ray Bartlett. Washington, Strode, and Robinson made up three of the team's four backfield...

In track and field, Robinson won the 1940 NCAA Men's Track and Field Championships in the Long Jump, jumping 24 ft...

While a senior at UCLA, Robinson met his future wife, Rachel Isum, a UCLA freshman who was familiar with Robinson's athletic career at PJC. In the spring semester of...

After the government ceased NYA operations, Robinson traveled to Honolulu in fall 1941 to play football for the semi-professional,...

In 1942, Robinson was drafted and assigned to a segregated Army cavalry unit in Fort Riley, Kansas. Having the...

After receiving his commission, Robinson was reassigned to Fort Hood, Texas, where he joined the 761st "Black Panthers" Tank Battalion. While at Fort...

An event on July 6, 1944, derailed Robinson's military career. While awaiting results of...

By the time of the court-martial in August 1944, the charges against Robinson had been reduced to two counts of insubordination...

After his acquittal, he was transferred to Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky, where he served as a coach for army athletics until receiving an honorable discharge in November...

After his discharge, Robinson briefly returned to his old football club, the Los Angeles Bulldogs. Robinson...

In early 1945, while Robinson was at Sam Huston College, the Kansas City Monarchs sent him a written offer to play professional...

During the season, Robinson pursued potential major-league interests. The Boston Red Sox held a tryout at Fenway Park for Robinson and other black players on April 16. The tryout, however, was a...

Other teams, however, had more serious interest in signing a black ballplayer. In the mid-1940s, Branch Rickey,...

Although he required Robinson to keep the arrangement a secret for the time being, Rickey committed to formally signing Robinson...

Rickey's offer allowed Robinson to leave behind the Monarchs and their grueling bus rides, and he went...

In 1946, Robinson arrived at Daytona Beach, Florida, for spring training with the Montreal Royals of the Class...

Robinson's presence was controversial in racially charged Florida. As he was not allowed to stay with his teammates at the team...

After much lobbying of local officials by Rickey himself, the Royals were allowed to host a game involving Robinson in Daytona Beach. Robinson made his...

The following year, six days before the start of the 1947 season, the Dodgers called Robinson up to the major leagues. With Eddie...

Robinson's promotion met a generally positive, although mixed, reception among newspapers and white major league players. However, racial tension existed in the Dodger...

Robinson was also derided by opposing teams. Some, notably the St. Louis Cardinals, threatened to strike if Robinson played. After the threat, National League President Ford Frick and Baseball...

Robinson did, however, receive significant encouragement from several major league players. Dodgers teammate Pee Wee Reese...

Robinson finished the season having played in 151 games for the Dodgers, with a batting average of .297, an on-base percentage...

Following Stanky's trade to the Boston Braves in March 1948, Robinson took over second base, where he logged a .980...

Racial pressure on Robinson eased in 1948 as a number of other black players entered the major leagues. Larry Doby (who broke...

In the spring of 1949, Robinson turned to Hall of Famer George Sisler, working as an advisor to the Dodgers, for batting help. At Sisler's...

That year, a song about Robinson by Buddy Johnson, "Did You See Jackie Robinson Hit That Ball?", reached number 13 on the charts; Count Basie recorded a famous version. Ultimately, the Dodgers won the National League pennant, but...

Summer 1949 brought an unwanted distraction for Robinson. In July, he was called to testify before the...

In 1950, Robinson led the National League in double plays made by a second baseman with 133. His salary that year was the highest any...

Robinson's Hollywood exploits, however, did not sit well with Dodgers co-owner Walter O'Malley, who referred to Robinson as "Rickey's prima donna". In late 1950, Rickey's contract...

Before the 1951 season, O'Malley reportedly offered Robinson the job of manager of the Montreal Royals, effective...

During the 1951 season, Robinson led the National League in double plays made by a second baseman for the second...

Despite Robinson's regular-season heroics, the Dodgers lost the pennant on Bobby Thomson's famous home run, known as the Shot Heard 'Round the World, on October 3, 1951. Overcoming his dejection, Robinson dutifully...

Robinson had what was an average year for him in 1952. He did, however, record a career-high...

In 1953, Robinson had 109 runs, a .329 batting average, and 17 steals, leading the Dodgers to another National League pennant (and another...

In 1954, Robinson had 62 runs, a .311 batting average, and 7 steals. His best day at the plate was on June 17, when he hit two home runs and two doubles. The following autumn, Robinson won his only championship when the...

In 1956, Robinson had 61 runs, a .275 batting average, and 12 steals. After the...

Robinson's major league debut brought an end to approximately sixty years of segregation in professional baseball, known as the baseball color...

Beginning his major league career at the relatively advanced age of twenty-eight, he played only ten seasons from 1947 to...

Robinson's career is generally considered to mark the beginning of the post–"long ball" era in baseball, in which a reliance on raw power-hitting gave way...

Historical statistical analysis indicates Robinson was an outstanding fielder throughout his ten years in the major leagues and at virtually every position he...

Assessing himself, Robinson said, "I'm not concerned with your liking or disliking me ... all I ask is that you respect...

Robinson retired from baseball at age 37 on January 5, 1957. Later that year, after he complained of numerous physical ailments, his doctors diagnosed him with diabetes, a disease...

In his first year of eligibility for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962, Robinson encouraged voters to consider only his on-field...

In 1965, Robinson served as an analyst for ABC's Major League Baseball Game of the Week telecasts, the first black person to do so. In 1966, Robinson was hired as general manager...

On June 4, 1972, the Dodgers retired his uniform number, 42, alongside those of Roy Campanella (39) and Sandy Koufax (32). From 1957 to 1964, Robinson was the vice president for personnel at Chock full o'Nuts; he...

Robinson was active in politics throughout his post-baseball life. He identified himself as a political independent, although he held conservative opinions on several issues, including the...

Protesting the major leagues' ongoing lack of minority managers and central office personnel, Robinson turned down an invitation to appear in an old-timers' game at Yankee Stadium in 1969. He made his final public...

After Robinson's retirement from baseball, his wife, Rachel Robinson, pursued a career in academic nursing. She became an assistant professor at the Yale School...

Robinson's eldest son, Jackie Robinson Jr., had emotional trouble during his childhood and entered special education at an early age. He enrolled in the Army...

Robinson did not long outlive his son. Complications of heart disease and diabetes weakened Robinson and...

After Robinson's death, his widow founded the Jackie Robinson Foundation, of which she remains an officer as of 2009. On April 15, 2008, she announced that in 2010 the...

According to a poll conducted in 1947, Robinson was the second most popular man in the country, behind Bing Crosby. In 1999, he was named by Time on its list of the 100 most...

The City of Pasadena has recognized Robinson in several ways. Brookside Park, situated next to the Rose Bowl, features a baseball...

Major League Baseball has honored Robinson many times since his death. In 1987, both the National and American League Rookie of the Year Awards were renamed the "Jackie Robinson Award" in honor of the first recipient (Robinson's Major...

As an exception to the retired-number policy, MLB in 2007 begun honoring Robinson by allowing players to wear number 42 on April 15, Jackie Robinson Day, which is now an annual...

At the November 2006 groundbreaking for a new ballpark for the New York Mets, Citi Field, it was announced that the main entrance,...

Robinson has also been recognized outside of baseball. In December 1956, the NAACP recognized him with the Spingarn Medal,...

A number of buildings have been named in Robinson's honor. The UCLA Bruins baseball team plays in Jackie Robinson Stadium, which, because of...

In 2011, the U.S. placed a plaque at Robinson's Montreal home to honor the ending of segregation in baseball. The house, on 8232 avenue de...


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